Bhagavad Gita Course

Bhagavad Gita Course

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Supriya Das posted Feb 10 at 12:21 pm

This question is from lesson 5. Kamya karma arises out of desires. So choosing between career fields can be considered Kamy karma?


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Jagmohan khanna posted Jan 10 at 7:21 am

The holy Geeta is spelled Geeta whereas all other publications hitherto since time memorial have spelled Gita . Is there any special reason for this ?


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Hello everyone,


I'm currently enrolled in the Bhagavad Gita online course and have been reflecting deeply on its teachings, particularly regarding the concept of the three gunas (sattva, rajas, and tamas) and their influence on our nature and actions. I'm intrigued by how these teachings apply to our modern choices, especially in selecting a suitable occupation.


In Chapter 18, verses 41-44, the Gita outlines the duties of the different varnas (classes) based on the predominance of gunas. This got me thinking about the contemporary relevance of these teachings. In today's world, where the notion of 'free choice' in careers is prevalent, how do we reconcile this with the Gita's guidance on aligning our occupation with our inherent guna composition?


Additionally, I'm curious about how the Gita addresses the concept of vasanas (subtle impressions of past actions and experiences) and their depletion through following one's swadharma (own duty). How does this align with the idea of pursuing an occupation that might not traditionally align with our guna composition but feels personally fulfilling?


I would greatly appreciate any insights or interpretations from the course materials or your personal studies on how we can apply these teachings to find a fulfilling occupation in today's context, where there is often a mismatch between our inherent nature and our chosen profession.


Thank you for your guidance.


recent by Mahavir Jain  ·  Jan 4 at 3:42 am
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Hello everyone,


I'm currently enrolled in the Bhagavad Gita online course and have been reflecting deeply on its teachings, particularly regarding the concept of the three gunas (sattva, rajas, and tamas) and their influence on our nature and actions. I'm intrigued by how these teachings apply to our modern choices, especially in selecting a suitable occupation.


In Chapter 18, verses 41-44, the Gita outlines the duties of the different varnas (classes) based on the predominance of gunas. This got me thinking about the contemporary relevance of these teachings. In today's world, where the notion of 'free choice' in careers is prevalent, how do we reconcile this with the Gita's guidance on aligning our occupation with our inherent guna composition?


Additionally, I'm curious about how the Gita addresses the concept of vasanas (subtle impressions of past actions and experiences) and their depletion through following one's swadharma (own duty). How does this align with the idea of pursuing an occupation that might not traditionally align with our guna composition but feels personally fulfilling?


I would greatly appreciate any insights or interpretations from the course materials or your personal studies on how we can apply these teachings to find a fulfilling occupation in today's context, where there is often a mismatch between our inherent nature and our chosen profession.


Thank you for your guidance.


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Sheela Mukherjee posted Aug 23 '23 at 7:41 am

Its was said that Sattvik ahara leads to chitta shuddhi eventually . In this connection Also it was stated that non vegetarian food etc though nutritious is bad as it affects the mind. In Bengal Fish is offered as prasad to Godess Durga and during Durga puja and even otherwise eating fish is considered good. In fact only the widows are barred from eating non vegetarian food. Similarly during Kali Puja Goat is sacrificed in kali temple and eaten as prasad later. So how is this explained and what is the meaning behind this?


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NAVEEN KUMAR TALLURU posted Oct 11 '23 at 5:01 am

In the Chapter 1 , 41 and 42 slokas Arjuna explains the results of the war in terms of family dynasty destruction and respective sastra rituals will be lost and there is possibility of Kula shayam.


Curious to know, anywhere in gita(18 chapters) does Krisha answered this doubt or directed the right path for this issue.


Please help.


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Sheela Mukherjee posted Aug 23 '23 at 7:33 am

In lesson 29 it is stated that when we choose our profession as per our natural Aptitude then we take to it like fish to water and obtain success. But most of the times we do not know what we are really good at and hence choose a profession as per what will enable us to work, earn money and look after our dependents. In such cases if we work in our chosen profession with with the right attitude and as a worship of God why will it not lead to our well being?. I had ticked this option in my answer to the questionnaire and it was marked wrong.


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Supriya Das posted Jul 26 '23 at 6:19 am

As explained in lesson 1, Special features of the Gita in Point number 5 (i) that our innate nature is to avoid a problem or escape a trouble situation. And Bhagvad Gita empowers us to face them effectively. I am abit confused here with this statement.
Sometimes situations can be worse and escaping it is the best option to be on the right path and prevent self from harm.
How do we decide?


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Sagar Manglani posted Jul 7 '23 at 6:20 am

In Lesson 2, it says - what do we surrender and to whom ? TO give up one's ego at the altar of a higher authority is surrender.


what does altar mean in this context ?


It could have said, to give up one's ego to higher authority is surrender however is has mentioned "at the altar" of a higher authority.


Can someone please guide.


Thanks


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In Lesson 11 notes, section 6.13 states:


"Each found himself (atmanam) in himself (atmani) by himself (atmana). This is what happens in Realisation. The individual (jiva), the meditator, realises the infinite (Self), his own true nature, in the cave of the heart (within himself - in the core of himself), by the mature thought: 'I am the Infinite Self'. "


My question:


  • Is it the mind, intellect or ego of the meditator that achieves self-realization? I am assuming that the Self does not have any ignorance about Self.

recent by Arvind  ·  May 13 '23 at 4:42 am
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Seema Bose posted Feb 18 '23 at 7:21 pm

The URL for Lesson 3 Study Material is incorrect. The URL is Lesson 3.pdf.html. Because of the extension html at the end of the URL, the study material cannot be downloaded.


Please correct the URL or send me a PDF copy at my email.


Thank you,


recent by Arvind  ·  Mar 4 '23 at 7:18 am
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Santosh Sali posted Feb 3 '23 at 2:58 pm

I started a BhagVadGita course (30 sessions one).


May I know, how many participants are currently taking up the course?


Are any guided discussions are happening?


Are can we initiate discussions?


I planned to write little bit - for self-reflection after reading/listening each lesson.


Here is one post that I wrote. ["Post after Lesson First"]


I would love to interact with other learners/students of Gita. Thanks.


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Ben Simpson posted Oct 25 '22 at 10:08 pm

is there another place where you can send questions about vedanta?


my question doesnt seem to be getting a response.


is my question inappropriate?


i appologise for my jivas ignorance if so.


hari aum


ben


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It seems to my jiva that from the perspective of "pots" things can be right and wrong , good and bad (this is the everyday world of the jiva, the samsari)


But


Just below the surface (in fact zero distance away from the pot is the the clay!) is the realm of the clay (ishvara) and in that place that perspective of pot is gone.


In that place every "thing" (any thought, feeling or perception) ignorance included is exactly where its meant to be until its not mean to be there (say when a jiva discovers the vedas).


This would make a Jiva's ignorance completely blameless (though it would not protect it from the results of bad actions)


does that sound right?


Ben


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